Collider Sprints

Collider Sprints are projects designed to connect students with thought leaders in industry and academia.  In an effort to find the next emerging fields in tech, Collider Sprint topics are proposed by industry or academic research centers and designed to challenge students to develop innovative solutions that lead to industry or technology advancement, new venture creation, or measurable social impact. Mentoring by industry experts provides students valuable insight into new markets and opportunities while expanding personal and professional networks.  All Collider Sprints are team-based and project-driven, providing an opportunity to sharpen teamwork and leadership skills in a multidisciplinary environment.

Collider Graphic Edited II

Who Participates?

Undergraduate students, graduate students, researchers, investors, entrepreneurs, and industry leaders can participate in the Collider Sprints.

Students

Collider Sprints are innovation projects open to undergraduates and graduates of all disciplines that take place outside of the classroom. The class is offered during Fall and Spring semesters and is listed in the course catalog as INDENG 190c. Due to high demand and specific skill requirements for each Collider Sprint topic, enrollment into the class is application-based. It is the student's responsibility to drop the class if they are enrolled through CalCentral but do not get accepted. Announcements regarding the application will be posted on SCET media channels and registered students will receive an announcement through bCourses. The class is only offered P/NP and students may choose whether to take it for 2 units or none. Units from this class count towards fulfilling the Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Technology for undergraduate students.

Industry Sponsors
Advisors

Industry and Academic Advisors

Ikhlaq Sidhu

Faculty Director and Founder, SCET

Ken Singer

SCET Chief Learning Officer and Managing Director

Stephen Torres

Collider Sprint Faculty Advisor

Mehdi Maghsoodnia

Collider Sprint Faculty Advisor

Adam Dada

Collider Sprint Coordinator

Shomit Ghose

Lead Advisor for

Data Science

Ali Kashani

Lead Advisor for

Connected Cars

Mar Hershenson

Advisor for

Connected Cars

Ricardo San Martin

Lead Advisor for

Meat Alternatives

Anju Patwardhan

Lead Advisor for

Fintech

Yaya Fanusie

Lead Advisor for

Transnational Security

Sudeep Badjatia

IBM

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Sean O'Keefe

SRO & Associates
Santa Clara University

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Patrick Chiang

Empath, Founder + CEO

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Kelly Becker

Under Armour

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Noman Ahmad

SportsLab, Co-founder

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Gaurav Bhogale

Google

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Jesse Douglas

Nest @ Google

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Tashaan Forehan-Kelly

Athlete Mentor and Founder

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Mai Nguyen

UC Berkeley, PhD

Advisor for

Sports Tech

Latest Collider Sprints

“We believe healthcare is poised to change in the next few decades and one of the fundamental force vector of change is data and the free flow of health data cross platforms. Similar to how data is now flowing freely online from search engines to consumers, health information and insight needs to also flow freely but in a way that protects privacy and confidentiality.

Students will explore how to leverage blockchain technology to provide better privacy and security to consumers regarding their health information. Students also explore if smart contracts can be used to allow for transfer of information both genetic and phenotypic information among health providers, data analytical platforms, hospitals and government agencies in a way that is both secure but provides a level of control and transparency to end consumers.

The class will explore these topics and the teams will be challenged to come up with ideas to enable this new market. The winning team will win a cash award in a coin that is actively traded on one of the major exchanges.  Learn more...

Critical Product Management: Hacking the product development lifecycle

Both startups and global leaders face the same underlying challenge: to effectively take an idea from concept to market. CEOs tell their product teams, ‘Solve this problem...go.’ For many on the receiving end, four daunting words may come to mind as they ponder the impossible: The Magic Happens Here.

Shrewd product managers know that there is no magic, and instead exploit a 6-phase process known as the Delivery Lifecycle. Projects of any scope, in departments of any task, by companies of any size, will be poised for success by faithfully applying its principles. Whether you’re managing the creation of the next great AI app or the building of robotic systems, this hack is a must for anyone that deals with product in a development or marketing context.

In this course, students will apply the delivery lifecycle to multiple development and business scenarios based on real-world timing and resources. Students will also explore Agile and DevOps methodologies. Ultimately, they will work in teams to build apps using the principles learned. Knowing the delivery lifecycle isn’t rocket science, but knowing how to THINK using the delivery lifecycle is.

During the course, you will learn the basics of being a management or technology consultant. Through reading, case studies and hands-on application, you will gain a deeper understanding of how the consulting process works and begin to develop the skills you need to have a career in consulting.

Henry Ford’s introduction of the Model T automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry. But when Ford introduced his first car, the world had no roads, gas stations, garages, driving licenses, traffic schools, car insurance, speed limits, taxis, traffic cops with radars, repair technicians, oil change, auto parts manufacturers, Truecar.com, Mad Max movie, etc. All of these industries, innovations, regulations, social changes, health issues, entertainment opportunities, etc., became an integral part of the ecosystem centered around “the car” which we don’t even notice today in our daily lives.

It has been a bit over a hundred years since the Model T was introduced. And as the “car” became one of the most important modes of transportation for humans, it also created many problems that the world is constantly dealing with. The United Nations ranks energy, sustainable cities, and sustainable environment as three of the top twelves global challenges of our times. These challenges are caused in large part by the "car ecosystem”. To address these challenges, innovators, technologists and business entrepreneurs have started looking at an old dream: flying vehicles.

In this course, we will imagine together a not-so-far future where “flying vehicles” are introduced to the market and a new ecosystem emerges around them. Students will have the chance to learn about current technological, social and business trends which are beginning to shape the flying cars ecosystem and then help design its future.

Previous Collider Sprints

Intellectual Property

Collider Sprints do not change the ownership of IP.

  1. If the problem and resources to work on the problem are provided by a sponsoring firm and no substantial use of facilities and equipment are provided by the university, then the firm may own the resulting IP, similar to an internship.
  2. If the resources to work on the problem, including substantial use of facilities and equipment, are provided by the university, then the IP may be open or protected by the university at the discretion of the faculty and researchers.
  3. For projects proposed and conducted entirely by students who are not paid employees of the university, such as undergraduates students, then students will continue to own the work of their project as well as have the ability to make their results open.

Sponsors and Partners